Canon patents an Osmo-style camera with interchangeable lenses

It could work with the company's RF lenses.

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Canon patent
Canon

Canon could take a page from DJI’s playback for its next camera. The company has filed a patent, first spotted by Canon News, that showcases a handheld camera that combines an Osmo Pocket-like design with its RF series of mirrorless lenses. The camera features a swivel mechanism that allows the sensor and lens mount to easily switch between forward-facing and selfie orientations.

The design offers several advantages to your traditional camera when it comes to vlogging. The most notable of which is you wouldn’t have to contort your hand to properly frame yourself in the shot. The fact the screen is always in front of you would also make it easier to keep tabs on your footage as it’s recording. Speaking of the screen, a fully articulating one isn’t a necessity here thanks to the swivel mechanism. Another advantage is that you could use Canon’s full-frame glass with this gadget, opening up the opportunity for some cinematic shots. 

Canon handheld camera
Canon

Of course, the design isn’t without its quirks. One of which is that the camera’s hot shoe (the component labelled “P” in the top diagram) would become unusable in the gadget’s selfie orientation. For a camera that’s built around vlogging, that wouldn’t be ideal; most external mics attach to a camera through its hot shoe. There’s also no mention of gimbal support in Canon’s documentation, meaning any stabilization would have to be provided by a potential in-body mechanism and through the lens. Using Canon’s full-frame glass would also come with a trade-off. RF lenses aren’t the lightest (or most affordable) you can buy, and the resulting camera likely wouldn’t be pocketable. 

As with all patents, this one might not lead to a product you’ll be able to buy. However, as Canon News points out, the company has filed five separate patents related to this design, which indicates it’s at least serious about the idea.

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