Note to carriers: don't falsely bill customers -- who just happen to be lawyers -- for $14,000 in charges they never racked up. That's the lesson Canada's Rogers Wireless learned the hard way this week, getting slapped with a $2,000 fine (pennies by Rogers' standards, we know, but a nice little bonus in the customer's pocket) for turning off customer (and lawyer) Susan Drummond's son's phone after she refused to pay 14 grand in long distance calls she hadn't placed (we're pretty sure those are Canadian dollars, but it's still some serious dinero). But wait, the story doesn't end there: it turns out the original incident had taken place in 2005 after Ms. Drummond's phone was stolen out of her house while she was away. Ted Rogers -- as in, "Rogers Wireless" Ted Rogers -- personally got involved after he caught wind of the situation, turning the phone back on, wiping out the bill, and hooking up the Drummonds with a cool $5,000. Ms. Drummond decided to ignore the goodwill gesture, though, and take Rogers to court anyway for breach of contract, where she won. Paying attention here, AT&T?

[Thanks, Brian]

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