Not that it comes as much of a surprise, but the FCC today rejected upstart M2Z's request for a 20MHz slice of the 2155MHz to 2175MHz spectrum, which it had hoped to use for a free, nearly nationwide WiFi service. To that end, M2Z was trying to convince the FCC to bypass its usual proceedings and hand over the spectrum to it for free. In exchange, as Ars Technica reports, M2Z promised to pay five percent of its gross revenues to the US Treasury each year and, as an added touch, it also promised to filter any "objectionable content" crossing those free airwaves. Apparently keen on that idea, a number of other companies tried to get in on the action as well, but were likewise turned down by the FCC. For its part, the FCC now seems intent on proceeding as usual with the spectrum, with Chairman Kevin Martin saying he'll consider both licensed and unlicensed uses for the band, adding that he promises to "adopt flexible rules that will encourage the innovative use of this unique piece of spectrum."

[Via AHN]

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FCC turns down M2Z's free WiFi proposal