2008 has been somewhat of a banner year for 3D, but the brilliant minds at MIT are already working up a system that'll put U23D to shame. Hailed as a "super-realistic image system," the invention produces "6D" images that not only have a full three-dimensional appearance, but also "respond to their environment, producing natural shadows and highlights depending on the direction and intensity of the illumination around them." Without relying on electronics or active control, the process could be used to produce images with an "unprecedented degree of realism" -- resulting in something associate professor Ramesh Raskar calls the "ultimate synthetic display." As expected, initial applications for the ultra-pricey ($30 per pixel, currently) system revolve around digital signage / advertising, but it's really just a matter of time before Six Dimensions of The Jonas Brothers hits a cinema near you. Save us.

Intel: oh yeah, and we're calling Nehalem Core i7