Metareview -- Fallout 3 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360)

If, like us, you were frantically grasping at any excuse to avoid Fallout 3 and give the ol' wallet a break from its October pummeling, these glowing reviews of Bethesda's post-apocalyptic prance-about are sure to disappoint you. We realize Dystopic is hard to broach, but it seems we'll just have to (somehow) make time to explore the devastated landscape left in the wake of Fallout's radioactive return.
  • 1UP (A): "Faults be damned, though; this is the kind of hugely ambitious game that doesn't come around very often, and when it does, you'd be a fool not to play it and enjoy the hell out of it and look forward to the day (next-next-gen?) when the fidelity of open-world RPGs takes another big step closer to the uncanny valley's far side."
  • Eurogamer (100/100): "Despite so many worries, Fallout 3 almost effortlessly succeeds in its central aim of reviving a much-loved brand to appeal to the vast majority of players. It's a thrilling, all-consuming experience that will absorb you for weeks, whether you're attracted by the action, the adventure, or the role-playing, as you fall in love with the relentless excitement, incredible atmosphere, sense of place and sheer choice."
  • Worth Playing (95/100): "In the end, Fallout 3 feels like a Fallout game, and that is absolutely the highest compliment. Despite the changes, much of the charm and fun of the franchise remains intact, and despite the similarities to Elder Scrolls 4: Oblivion, I never felt that I was playing anything but a Fallout game."
  • Giant Bomb (80/100): "It's unfortunate that Fallout 3 is saddled with so many little- and medium-sized issues, because they get in the way of what's an otherwise fantastic experience. The world is well-realized and full of options. It'll be a struggle in spots, but I'm willing to guess that most people will be able to overlook a lot of the game's problems and still have a very good time exploring the irradiated wasteland formerly known as Washington DC."

This article was originally published on Joystiq.