Study: We're not all lonely, teenaged pariahs


We're fairly certain you don't need any convincing, but just in case someone's mom mistakenly stumbled across our website, it'll be nice for her to know that a recent study (all scientific-like!) cast the isolated gamer stereotype deep into question. Contrary to the belief that progress in Mario Bros. requires gamers to remain stationary, both on Cheeto-encrusted furniture and in their underdeveloped personal lives, a U.S. study, compiled by Ipsos MediaCT, concluded that 55% of game-playing folk are married, 48% have children and, of those who are parents, 57% play video games with their young ones.

The study further indicates that gamers are 11% more likely to play "sports," and single gamers are twice as likely to go out on a date in any given month, with 9% being more likely to "go out" with their friends than people who do not play video games. A separate Canadian study is similarly enlightening, labeling one in two Canadians as a gamer, with half of those being women and the average age hovering around 40.

Of course, neither study is very clear in distinguishing between casual and more serious gamers, but we'll leave that argument for another post.

[Thanks, blerg]

This article was originally published on Joystiq.