According to a Bloomberg report, the FCC will soon begin looking into the development of a universal rating system that would span television, games and mobile phone content. Unsurprisingly, the move comes in response to a Congressional call to see whether inappropriate content is harming children and if the current laws are adequate to protect them.

The Entertainment Software Association, according to the report, has previously stated that the FCC has no jurisdiction over video games. In a statement given to GameSpot, ESA senior vice president for communications and industry affairs Rich Taylor stated that the current ESRB rating system is "considered by parents, family advocates, the Federal Trade Commission, and elected officials as the gold standard in providing caregivers with the information they need to make the right choices for their families." He added further that a new universal system would "confuse consumers, violate the Constitution's first amendment, and are a solution in search of a problem."

We might also add that television, video games and mobile phone content are -- with few exceptions -- different forms of media. After all, it doesn't really make sense to use the same scale to judge both Batman: Arkham Asylum and your "Yakety Sax" ringtone. Or does it?

Source - Bloomberg
Source - GameSpot

This article was originally published on Joystiq.

WRUP: Joystiq Asylum edition