TIGA and ELSPA form Steering Committee for UK tax relief

Looks like the UK's video game industry organizations aren't going to take the recent removal of their hard-fought game development tax relief plan from the nation's Emergency Budget lying down. Earlier today, TIGA and the ELSPA announced their partnership on a "Steering Committee" to investigate why the tax plan was put on ice. The duo plans to review the original submission to make a more compelling argument for gaming industry tax breaks.

Hopefully the group will find an effective solution for getting its plan approved. You know, a solution better than "let's throw our full support behind candidates in the upcoming election who promise to endorse our tax plan, only to have them forget about us mere moments after taking office."

The press release is posted after the break.

[Image credit: Bashed]

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TIGA and ELSPA form Steering Committee for Games Tax Relief Campaign

TIGA, the trade association representing the UK games industry,today announced that TIGA and ELSPA will form a steering committee immediately which will consist of members of TIGA, ELSPA and invited professional advisors in the areas of law, tax and public affairs. The steering committee will be lead by TIGA.

The aim of the steering committee will address the issue of why the Coalition Government withdrew the provision for Games Tax Relief in the Emergency Budget. It will also review TIGA's original submission for Games Tax Relief with a view to further enhancing the arguments, evidence and justification for the Government to provide a tax break for the sector.

Dr Richard Wilson, CEO of TIGA said:
"The UK video games industry is an industry of the future. It is an export oriented, high-tech, high skills, revenue generating industry. The games industry and policymakers know that the UK does not operate on a level playing field and we are seeing jobs and investment move abroad to countries that offer specific games tax breaks. TIGA is committed to getting Games Tax Relief introduced in the UK.

This article was originally published on Joystiq.