I've been spending some time making a home for myself on Artemis. Yes, I've moved away from the PvP server, and I haven't regretted it. I've never really participated in open PvP, so it's not really a surprise. I've said before that I only started on a PvP server to have that extra option available to me and to have an added dose of excitement. Well, your unofficial ambassador to Taborea may be changing his tune.

After I made the switch to PvE, I wasn't sure what to do. I already had a high-level character. I didn't feel ready to put my main to rest. It's been my dedicated character for over a year, and it does give me the advantage of accessing high-level content. With the limited time I have for Runes of Magic right now, let alone other MMOs, I was tentative about making an alt. I took the plunge, made an alt, and haven't looked back. Oddly enough -- or maybe not -- I'm enjoying PvP more on a PvE server.

I've found that I like alt life, and it has me thinking creatively about what to do with each character. I've spoken about PvP culture; I've mentioned my idea for improving battlefields; and last week I spoke about siege badges that can help you in battlefields. This week, I want to cover building a low-level PvP alt. There's a lot to be done in prepping a low-level PvP alt, so let's get busy.
Battlefield requirements

I admit that I've been out of the PvP loop for quite some time, but I've recently made a startling discovery. It appears that, at some point during my long hiatus from arena life, Runewaker has added a level divide. I only feel confident enough to tell you with certainty that players level 1-29 are separated from the pack. I've tested this nearly a hundred times now, between all the arena and battlefield instances. Knowing this, I set my sights on level 29. I'll be top of the tier with the best chances of competing in fights that last longer than three seconds.

Get those extra stat boosts

At level 29, all my character's base attributes are going to be relatively low. With such small numbers, any little extra stat boosts are going to be more important. I've been paying close attention to the title window and doing every quest I can. Gaining 5 HP per title will go a lot further when you're staring at a twink, especially if you're a caster. Don't let anyone dissuade you from joining guild siege to obtain the highly rewarding titles. Any level can be effective and will have a part to play. Any player of any level can be just as helpful as anyone else. I'm usually not too harsh in my tone, but I'll defend this one to the end.

Monster cards are giving small stat boosts per each one collected. With so many existing in the game, the nearly never-ending amount of time it would take to collect them all is worth it. Again, every little bit will help. The guild titles may also take awhile to obtain, but these will inject you with an incredible amount of power.

Don't forget to use your pet. Out of the many battlefield and arena matches I've been in, I can count on one hand the number of times I've seen others using a pet. Most players may think it's not worth it, but if you've raised it and purchased some passive skills, why wouldn't you take advantage of it? If you're going to raise a pet to aid you in PvP, concentrate all of its strengths into one area. If you're a caster and you want the added HP, then follow along that route. If you're a caster, find a pet with a high base stat in either stamina or wisdom. Once you choose, support that decision by spending TP on its passive magic attack or HP skills respectively.

Crafting or drops?

Crafting is going to be more beneficial at level 29. The majority of drops that you can wear are blue, and crafting can outdo some of those items' base stats. For time's sake, I am currently wearing and upgrading the mourner set that drops in Forsaken Abbey. For being under level 30, it's the best set a caster can get. The top-secret records set has rogue-focused bonuses, but it's only level 21. Another option is the Hochim set from the Windmill instance, but it can take a very long time to acquire and craft. It's even lower-level than the two I mentioned, but its stats are pretty good. Find some armor that you like that will be good enough to jump in the Battlefields without waiting, and work on harder-to-obtain armor while you happily build up some honor points. Whether you're crafting, buying or farming for your armor, finding pieces with durability bonuses should be high on your priority list.

It took me a few minutes to find a suitable 2-H staff to use while I continue to gather and craft towards a legendary 2-H staff. It sounds a bit sadistic, but I bought a blue feather staff recipe and want to keep crafting until I get the legendary version with a durability bonus.

From this point on, it's all about slowly modifying your gear.

Conclusion

On a long enough timeline, you will achieve champion twink status, but putting these goals in order could make the difference between a feeling of work or play. It's not imperative that you wait until level 29 before competing in battlefields. Go ahead and get a decent armor set. By the time you reach level 29, you should have enough gold or be strong enough to have run Forsaken Abbey many times over. Once your geared, you can jump in the PvP pits while slowly attaining titles, monster cards and better crafted weapons and armor.

If you fall into the less-time-but-more-money category, you may be happy to just buy a lot of stuff. Make sure to buy diamonds that will be unlocked and sell them to a trusted guildmate or friend. You'll have a nice pot of gold to buy pre-modded armor and weapons. Just make sure to spend that gold on mods that will take full advantage of your class. It can be a bit frustrating to find out you spent a nice chunk of real cash and wound up with gear that's significantly weaker than another piece a player modded without spending real cash. There's still a good chance you'll find someone with better mods who will tell you he didn't spend any real cash, but at least you'll feel adequately compensated by the strength of yours.

Each Monday, Jeremy Stratton delivers Lost Pages of Taborea, a column filled with guides, news, and opinions for Runes of Magic. Whether it's a community roundup for new players or an in-depth look at the rogue/priest combo, you'll find it all here. Send your questions to jeremy@massively.com.

This article was originally published on Massively.