Satellite dishes have come a long way in terms of design and size over the years, but Marcel van de Burgwal -- a grad student at the Netherlands' University of Twente -- has now invented a way to ditch the dish altogether. Channeling his inner Doc Brown, his invention revolves around an array of virtually flat antennas that receive satellite signals without the help of a concave backing. His design also conveniently eliminates the need to physically aim the receiver for reception -- much to the joy of actuaries everywhere. Instead, this task is performed by a network of small basic processors integrated into a single chip, which then bear the heavy calculation work of electronically aiming the receiver. The obvious impact of this design on consumer technology is that satellite receivers could soon make their way into all manner of handheld devices (read: smartphones). In fact, Marcel has already tested the chip's performance as a digital radio receiver for smartphones with successful results. That sounds like great news to us, but we understand if the branding folks at Dish Network are slightly less thrilled. For more details, hit the source link below.

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New satellite receiver design teases a glorious, dish-less future