Global Chat: Choosing your path edition

This looked far creepier in real life.  I promise.
Welcome to this week's Global Chat! We love hearing what you have to say at Massively, and we love it even more when we can share the best comments with all of our readers. Massively staffers will be contributing some of their favorite comments every week, so keep an eye out every Sunday for more Global Chat!

This week's comments have proved to be all about decisions. Where do you want to go in a game that you purchased when you often have a broad variety of choices available? What game should you support in the hopes that it will succeed? Should you hope for another game to die so that your favorite one might live? Will you go down the creepy forest path or run back to the car?

OK, maybe that last one wasn't in the comments this week, but the rest of them were. Jump on past the break to see some of the choice comments from the past week's articles.

Amidst discussions of the best reveal from this year's Gamescom, MMOaddict had some thoughts regarding Blizzard's current status as a developer and what it means to keep up a proper pace of content deployment when other companies have redefined "frequent content."
I have to disagree here. It takes World of Warcraft 10 times longer then everyone else to poop out content, all while charging a monthly sub. Yet, a new kid on the block, Trion, pumps out new content once a month. Guess where I feel I'm getting the most bang for my buck? RIFT, that's where.

Granted, I like WoW and Blizzard, but now that we've been shown a game can patch content like crazy right after launch, there is no excuse anymore. Blizzard needs to step up the game. Right now, I'm not even considering any Blizzard product due to the fierce competition with BioWare, Trion, ArenaNet, and a few other games I'm watching.
We thought that a recent article about high attrition rates for video games was worth a day of discussion. But Zaniac had some thoughts that went to one side, specifically of the mindset that the very question was somewhat moot.
A book is like a path. You are plonked down at the beginning of the path and have to make it to the end of it.

A computer game these days is a lot like a forest. You're plonked down in the middle of it and can go whichever way you want, do whatever you please, for however long you like.
Last but not least, this week's Soapbox installment talked about the fate of Star Wars: The Old Republic and how both success and failure could end up being bad for the industry. real65rcncom had some thoughts about a related issue, however -- that hoping it will fail to ensure the success of another game is just plain bad soup.
Many people wanting SWTOR to fail want it to fail because their game could suffer from the subscriber exodus. There is this general feeling among people playing a game now that in order for their game to succeed and survive, SWTOR must die. They fear the mass exodus of potential players and come up with 100 scenarios on why no one in his right mind would ever think about playing SWTOR. Then they log into their games and see nothing from their own communities to suggest that the game they are playing now is failing in many ways.

People have to learn that if you like your game, stick with it. Everyone else is going to try it, and many probably won't (statiscally) stick around. They will leave for one reason or another.

But trying to scuttle a game before it's even launched is juvenile and only hurts the industry in the long run. There is room for everyone's tastes, and just because your game has to close 40 servers or 200 doesn't mean you should root for the next game to end up that way.

Remember, as much as you hate WoW or SWTOR, without big budget games pulling in casuals, your game doesn't even get made in the first place.
So what do you think? Let us know in the comments!

Global Chat is the weekly feature that's all about you, our readers. Every Sunday we collect the best, funniest, and most thought-provoking comments from the Massively readers and round them up into Global Chat for discussion. Read over them for yourself, hit the comment button, and add your own thoughts!
This article was originally published on Massively.