Mataerial 3D printer escapes the tyranny of layers, changes colors on the fly video

Anyone who has used conventional 3D printers knows that they work by stacking layer on layer, limiting just what they can create and where. Mataerial's upcoming printer, started by Joris Laarman Lab and IAAC, doesn't abide by those petty rules. Its robotic arm draws instantly solid 3D curves rather than 2D slices, shedding the need for direct support or even a horizontal surface. It's also not bound by traditional approaches to color. As Mataerial injects dye at the last moment, it can switch hues mid-stream and introduce subtle gradients. We've reached out for launch and pricing details, but it's reasonable to presume that such advanced control won't come cheap -- we'd look to the 3Doodler for more affordable in-air artistry.