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Venmo mobile payments

eBay's Venmo mobile payment service can be extra-helpful when you need to repay a debt to a friend, but it's grappling with some significant security problems -- and it's not clear that a proper fix is in sight. Slate notes that Venmo not only lacks a few basic security measures, such as notifying you when login details change, but encourages risky steps like linking your bank routing info. If someone gets in under that circumstance, your bank account could be permanently compromised. There's also little support outside of a slow-to-respond email system, so you may be left high and dry if you need urgent help.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Even though Lenovo unveiled new tablets a little over 12 hours ago, it isn't quite done with Mobile World Congress announcements just yet. Now it's taking the wrapper off three more devices, two of which are Android smartphones that you probably won't be able to get in the U.S. One is the Lenovo Vibe Shot, a super slim handset that looks eerily like a camera, while the other is the Lenovo A7000, apparently the world's first smartphone to come with Dolby Atmos. The third new product of the bunch is the simply-named Lenovo Pocket Projector, a tiny little projector that's pretty versatile for its size.

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Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet

2014 was an odd year for Sony. Can you think of another company that released five flagship products in a single year? We're talking the Xperia Z2, the Z3, the Z3 Compact, the Z2 Tablet, the Z3 Tablet Compact. That's an awful lot of Zs. At MWC in Barcelona, it's leaving its flagship phones be, and bringing a new full-sized tablet -- the Xperia Z4 Tablet -- and the mid-range Xperia M4 Aqua.

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Over the past few weeks, Nikon has introduced two DSLRs: the D5500 and D810A. And it doesn't look like the company plans to slow down its rollout of new cameras. Now, Nikon is introducing the D7200, a successor to the relatively popular D7100, which was introduced back in 2013. The D7200 is the latest to be introduced to the Nikon's line of lightweight DSLR, packing a 24.2-megapixel DX CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter, an EXPEED 4 image processing chip, a 51-point autofocus system and a 3.2-inch fixed LCD. Video-wise, the D7200 can shoot 1080p at up to 60 fps, albeit in the 1.3 crop mode; in DX mode, meanwhile, the options are 24, 25 and 30 fps. It's also the first Nikon DSLR to have both WiFi and NFC, which should make it extremely easy for people to share their images wirelessly.

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If you're a fan of superzoom cameras, you may have to look no further than Nikon's Coolpix P900 to find the category's new king. This compact, yet powerful point-and-shoot features a remarkable 83x optical zoom, the equivalent of 24-200mm, which is quite outstanding for a camera this size. While the whopping zoom range is the obvious highlight spec here, there's a lot more to the Coolpix P900. Namely, a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor, an autofocus system with support for up to 7 fps continuous shooting, NFC, WiFi and a 3-inch, articulating LCD display. Sure, those seem like standard features found in most entry-level cameras nowadays, more or less -- but not so much the super, super 83x zoom. Either way, Nikon's making its Coolpix P900 available next month for $600, in case any of you are into it.

Are you?

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When Brad Molen described Sony's Xperia Z Ultra as "the best phone you'll probably never buy," it was probably true of most Sony smartphones. The 6.44-inch device had a beautiful design, good build quality, had a fast engine and could withstand water, much like every other Sony smartphone you see. The downside to that, of course, is that it's a Sony, and that seems to have been enough for buyers to take their money elsewhere. But what did you, oh people who bought one, actually think of it? Head over to our forum and talk about what you liked, what you hated and what you wanted to change.

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Iddo BMX bike activity tracker

There's no shortage of bike sensors that will track your performance. However, they usually assume that you're on a garden variety road bike. What if your definition of biking involves BMX races or trick jumps? Never fear -- you now have an activity tracker to call your own. Iddo has launched a crowdfunding drive for what it says is the world's first BMX bike sensor. The angry-looking add-on (seriously, it's a little metal skull) will capture 'boring' details like speed and GPS position, but it also includes a 9-axis motion sensor and an altimeter to detect your air time and tricks. The companion smartphone app will even score stunts, so you have an added incentive to master that bunny hop or tailwhip. If you're racing, Iddo will let you map tracks and measure your lap times.

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The hub on a BlackBerry Classic

BlackBerry has only been willing to give out tiny pieces of its smartphone experience so far, like BBM and its enterprise servers, but it's going to be much more liberal in the near future. It's launching BlackBerry Experience Suite, a collection of apps and services that bring some of its biggest features to Android, iOS and Windows gear in hopes of making them mainstays of the working world. Some of them are more behind-the-scenes features that keep your corporate info both secure and separate from your personal affairs. However, others are very conspicuously borrowed from BlackBerry 10 smartphones. The company is promising the BlackBerry Hub (which unifies BB10's messaging), universal search and even its own input method -- yes, you may get a BlackBerry keyboard on your phone without resorting to a Typo case. The suite won't be available until later in the year, but it may be just the ticket if you or your office wants to try BlackBerry features while keeping the hardware and apps you already use.

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A Galaxy S5 for Sprint at a Best Buy store

Sprint still isn't done inventing new plans and promos in hopes that you'll sign up. Its latest move? It's launching a Best Buy-only plan that gives you both a smartphone and unlimited service for $65 per month if you get an iPhone 6, or $75 if you prefer Android. It's a nice deal if you're looking to avoid up-front hardware costs, although it's primarily for patient types -- you're locked into that phone for two years, and it'll cost you $10 extra per month if you want to upgrade devices every year. If you're happy to hang on to a phone for a while, though, you can swing past a Best Buy to check it out starting on March 1st.

[Image credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images]

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Withings Activite and Activite Pop

If you've been aching to try Withings' Activité fitness watches but couldn't because you don't carry an iPhone, you can relax. The company has announced that both the original Activité and the Pop will support Android as of March 2nd. While the Health Mate app will largely go unchanged, you'll be glad to hear that Withings' data will plug into Google Fit so that you can easily share it between devices. Given that the Pop hasn't reached US stores yet, this is good timing -- you can pick up the new wristwear knowing that it will likely work with your handset of choice.

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