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It's just a rumor, but DigiTimes has pretty decent sources within Taiwan's motherboard industry. So what was a Q1 2010 mass production launch of Clarkdale CPUs is now rumored to be coming in Q4, notable as the first Intel CPU to use its new 32nm process technology with an integrated memory controll

5 years ago 0 Comments
June 29, 2009 at 6:20AM
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In 2005 Intel revealed its 65-nm manufacturing process, then 45-nm in 2007. Today, in keeping with its \"tick-tock\" strategy, Intel is announcing a further shrinkage to its manufacturing process as it ends the development phase for 32-nm chip circuitry. That puts the chips on a production schedule fo

6 years ago 0 Comments
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We've seen some big names working on 32nm chips, and now we can add two more to the mix. According to Nikkei, Panasonic and Renesas have recently developed technology necessary to mass produce the little guys, using metal oxide film (instead of a silicon material) for the insulating layer and titani

6 years ago 0 Comments
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As of this morning you can add Hitachi to the list of cohorts IBM has gathered in its quest for sub-32nm circuitry. Hitachi's 2-year semiconductor research agreement -- a first between IBM and Hitachi -- puts them under a loose-knit alliance with AMD, Chartered, Freescale, Infineon, Samsung, Sony, T

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Toshiba just announced its membership in an alliance to develop system chips using 32-nm circuitry. That's well below the existing 45-nm processes used in manufacturing Intel's Penryn, for example. The alliance includes IBM, AMD, Samsung (already pushing 30-nm NAND), Infineon, Freescale, and Singapo

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We're not sure what's more impressive here: the fact that Samsung has produced the world's first 30nm-class 64Gb (bit, not byte!) NAND chip or that they're now roping defenseless product waifs into hawking their silicon wafers. Nevertheless, we're looking at a serious jump in density in just 10 mon

7 years ago 0 Comments