Post Thumbnail

We're no strangers to projects that try to capture the power of the human body, but here's one with a peculiar twist. A pair of researchers from Montreal's École de Technologie Supérieure have cooked up a headset that, while extremely goofy-looking, can harness the power of your migh

2 months ago 0 Comments
September 22, 2014 at 6:03AM
Post Thumbnail

Pacemakers and other electronic implants are a pain to keep running -- patients need surgery to replace batteries, and body-powered generators aren't currently strong enough to charge these devices. They may be far more practical in the future, though, as American and Chinese researchers have deve

10 months ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

The verdict's still out on whether or not androids dream of electric sheep. But their ability to feel? Well, that's about to approach levels of human sensitivity. We're of course talking about the sense of touch, not emotions. And thanks to work out of Georgia Tech, tactile sensitivity for robotic

1 year ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Sure, Nike+ will track your gait and help you tell your friends just how that couch-to-2K training is working for ya, but wouldn't it be nice if it your shoes were smarter? That's partly what Murata is enabling with its Walking Measurement System, on display at CEATEC 2012. It's a piezoelectric se

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

It was just over a year ago when we met with the folks from Immersion, and they showed us a prototype handset packing its HD haptics technology. Since that time, the piezoelectric actuator that makes the tactile magic possible has gone into mass production, and the first commercial device packing s

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

What's that, you're not into changing the channel with that boring old remote, or even with your voice? Murata's ground-up Tactile Controller brings a real twist to every couch potato's favorite gadget. Quite literally. The company's prototype remote uses touch-pressure pads and pyroelectricity t

3 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have come up with a way to produce electricity from just about the most renewable source known to man -- his own breath. It's all thanks to a plastic microbelt developed by engineers Xudong Wang, Chengliang Sun and Jian Shi. Made of a material known

3 years ago 0 Comments