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While we've seen supercomputers break records before, rarely have we seen the barrier smashed quite so thoroughly as by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Sequoia supercomputer. Researchers at both LLNL and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have used planet-scale calculations on the Blue Gen

1 year ago 0 Comments
April 30, 2013 at 8:44PM
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Oh Sequoia, why are you so changeable? The thoroughly hacked electronic voting machine is back with another ignoble showing, courtesy of researchers from the universities of Michigan and, of course, Princeton. Picking up an AVC-Edge box that had seen live duty in collecting votes for the 2008 Virgi

4 years ago 0 Comments
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Oh, Princeton University, won't you leave the poor electronic voting machines alone? Haven't they suffered enough without you forming teams with researchers from the University of California, San Diego and the University of Michigan to spread their private moments even further asunder? That group o

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Roadrunner? Pfff, your chart-topping 1.105 petaflops are laughable. IBM just announced its 20-freaking-petaflop Sequoia supercomputer due for delivery by 2012. While supercomputer speeds have steadily increased year-over-year, a near 20x jump in calculations per second since the last world ranking

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Princeton professors Ed Felten and Andrew Appel are certainly no strangers to drawing controversy, and it now looks like they've stirred the pot yet again, this time drawing the ire of Sequoia Voting Systems as a result of their plans to conduct some further e-voting analysis. At the heart of this

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Voting machine makers scoffing at bad reviews? That's preposterous! Actually, it's not all that alarming to hear that Diebold, Hart InterCivic, and Sequoia Voting Systems all had less-than-amicable responses to a state study that \"found that their machines could be breached by hackers.\" Of course, w

7 years ago 0 Comments
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In an unprecedented attempt to shore up any possible flaws in its counties' electronic voting machines -- the same machines that have been examined and criticized nationwide on many occasions -- California will undertake a so-called \"top-to-bottom\" review of numerous systems from some half-a-dozen v

7 years ago 0 Comments
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It's no secret that e-voting machines here in the US and around the world have more security holes than a slice of Lorraine Swiss, but it took a Princeton professor and $82 to discover just how bad the situation really is. Now, one would think that election officials would destroy their old termina

7 years ago 0 Comments