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Imagine a shirt or pants that can detect movement and tell you if that golf swing was weak or that jump shot was a bit lacking. That's the biggest goal of a company called mCube: to have its new and really tiny accelerometer embedded in clothing, though it could obviously be used for sports bands

3 months ago 0 Comments
August 20, 2014 at 5:29AM
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It's common for brain surgery patients to stay awake. That's how surgeons know everything is going smoothly, after all. When concert violinist Roger Frisch started suffering from tremors that are only a problem when he's playing, however, Mayo Clinic doctors had to resort to some rather unusual te

3 months ago 0 Comments
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With the spate of bad publicity surrounding all those Kickstarter projects that never make it beyond the funding stage, there's a certain surreality to actually holding a crowd-funded device in your hands. But here it is, the Node, a project we highlighted in its infancy, way back in February. The

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Most video game controllers sporting a firearm form factor are a far cry from realistic -- bright colors, odd shapes and obvious thumbsticks leave many accessories looking more like toys than weapons. Not David Kotkin's Delta Six. This gun-shaped controller's first prototype looked so much like a

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Yes, we'll admit that we borrowed that pun in the title. MooresCloud founder Mark Pesce's Xzibit reference is still a very apt description of the Light, his company's Linux-based LED lamp. The Australian team's box-shaped illumination runs the open OS (including a LAMP web server stack) on an inte

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Chances are you know someone who takes their CoD a little too seriously -- well, this peripheral is for them. The Delta Six controller is the latest brainchild of Avenger inventor David Kotkin, made to please hardcore FPS gamers with immersive and responsive input. A built-in accelerometer is used

2 years ago 0 Comments
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The rectangular, predominantly symmetrical nature of most smartphones means if you're not looking, you might find you're holding the handset the wrong way around when a call comes in. Google's most recently awarded patent may seek to end your orientation confusion by adding a microphone and speake

2 years ago 0 Comments