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A recent article from Brian Krebs highlights a new trend in ATM skimmers: by using parts from cut-rate audio players and spy cams, criminals are able to construct something called an audio skimmer that records the data from the magnetic strip for later playback. Also included in the device is a min

4 years ago 0 Comments
November 24, 2010 at 7:48AM
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The hooligans in this case have a dry sense of humor or are extremely unlucky: Either way, we can't help but get a chuckle out of the fact that someone placed their smart card skimmin' faux ATM at the Riviera Hotel Casino in Las Vegas -- during DEFCON, the world's largest hacker convention. No one

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Aw, how convenient! Now, when you purchase your next ATM skimmer, you don't even have to risk being arrested when you wander out to retrieve it. For those outside of the know, an ATM skimmer sits on credit / debit card machines and swipes information as unsuspecting civilians pass their cards throug

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Joining the infamous Chip & PIN terminal hacks as yet another way to siphon banking details from unlucky Londoners, a group of \"malware purveyors\" reportedly dropped off tempting Trojan-infused USB drives in a UK parking lot in hopes that unsuspecting individuals would take the bait and subseque

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Although we wouldn't expect to find the latest release of Photoshop on your neighborhood ATM, it's not so far fetched to think that Paint would be left on a Windows-based ATM. We've seen a recent boost in cash machine hacking of late, and while this latest attempt doesn't siphon illegal coinage out

7 years ago 0 Comments

Hacking into sensitive machines and playing brain games on them certainly isn't new -- and a pair of researchers at Cambridge have already done just that on a \"tamper-proof chip-and-PIN payment terminal,\" -- but in a recent (and more serious) development, they've extended the exploit to demonstrate

7 years ago 0 Comments
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You're probably familiar with the Virginia Beach trickster who reprogrammed an ATM to shoot out 300% more money than was debited from his account, but now it seems his \"discovery\" might have been widely available all along. Dave Goldsmith, a computer security researcher at Matasano Security, began t

8 years ago 0 Comments