Post Thumbnail

Let's face it: the theatrical security procedures at airports aren't going away any time soon. However, they might just get more tolerable if a team of Israeli researchers bring a new, extremely sensitive bomb detection chip to an inspection line near you. The prototype sniffs for explosives by us

5 months ago 0 Comments
June 24, 2014 at 11:38PM
Post Thumbnail

We knew that well-trained bees were capable of sniffing out dynamite and other explosives, but researchers at MIT have now come up with a slightly less militant way to use our winged friends as bomb detectors. A team of chemical engineers at the school recently developed a new, ultra-sensitive se

3 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

If you've driven overseas or any mildly large city in America, there's a good chance you slipped by (or not) a red-light camera at a busy intersection. If you happened to be in the unlucky bunch that had to endure a stiff fine for trying to squeeze the lemon tomato, you'll certainly be interested in

7 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

While homemade nuke detectors patrolling our waterways seems sufficiently plausible, remote-controlled rats searching for explosives is certainly pushing the bounds of acceptability, but to expect a swarm of \"highly trained\" bees to sniff out destructive material (without getting medieval on somebod

7 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

While being in the weapons distribution biz may seem a bit dodgy, an enterprising team in San Francisco is looking to prove their device is out to protect and serve (and save a lot of money). The Department of Homeland Security is looking to add safeguards to American ports by installing a series of

8 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

WiFi detectors are a dime a dozen, but this two-faced device adds a second dimension not found on typical sniffers. Informatica's \"WiFi Pen,\" as the name clearly implies, is an ink pen at heart, but also has the ability to alert you of any local wireless networks in range. The lack of a true antenna

8 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Ever wonder if you'd object to currency, clothing, or even your body getting embedded with an RFID chip? The idea isn't that far-fetched, and it's just a matter of time before something you own is tagged. Joining a growing list of RFID-shielders, Vrije University's Andrew Tanenbaum, an anti-RFID adv

8 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Yogesh Gianchandani, a researcher at the University of Michigan, has developed a tiny wireless Geiger counter that can be used in a network to cover large areas like stadiums or malls and distinguish between harmful and non harmful sources of radiation. And since they're so small (about the size of

8 years ago 0 Comments