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Here's hoping there's more than a few military-style marches standing between us and a complete robotic takeover. If not, we've got some dire news: these are not simply miniature Roombas as they may appear, but 15 so-called Khepera bots capable of spelling out GRITS (for Georgia Robotics and Intell

3 years ago 0 Comments
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It seems that the availability of increasingly powerful GPUs, when combined with brute-force password cracking tools, is making it increasingly easy to crack passwords -- even if they're extremely well thought out, with symbols and quirky capitalization and all that. How short is too short? Accordi

4 years ago 0 Comments
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We were really happy to see how many people showed up to our meetup in Atlanta during CEDIA -- especially when everyone didn't leave immediately after they enjoyed the free food. The local Georgia Tech chapter of the Association of Computer Machinery were awesome hosts and did an impressive job at

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Imagine this -- one day, with enough steroids, your pet hamster actually could power your home by just running on its wheel. Georgia Tech researchers have discovered ways to \"convert even irregular biomechanical energy into electricity,\" and it's demonstrating the finding by showing off jacket-wear

5 years ago 0 Comments
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There's cheating, and then there's out-thinking the room. Georgia Tech's own Justin Needham and Matthew Straub are clearly headed for great things, as their Digitally Assisted Billiards is reason enough to give these guys a degree in our eyes. Using an array of low-end kit -- just an eBox 2300 embe

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Wireless power has come a long way from Nikola Tesla's early ruminations on the matter, and it looks like some researchers from Duke and Georgia Tech are now taking the idea to its logical, robot-powering conclusion. While their setup (thankfully) isn't yet able to power robots beyond the confines

6 years ago 0 Comments
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It turns out that the tongue isn't tied to the spinal cord (had we paid better attention in Bio101, we'd have known that), which goes a long way towards keeping it unimpared in the event of spinal cord injury. A team at Georgia Tech is developing a tongue-based apparatus for disabled people that,

6 years ago 0 Comments
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We've seen a couple robotic efforts to explore the Arctic and the Antarctic, but they've all been remotely-operated -- unlike the SnoMote, a new bot being developed at the Georgia Tech that can navigate itself around ice and snow. Packs of the mini-snowmobile-based SnoMotes can negotiate with each

6 years ago 0 Comments