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When we were kids, we assumed that in the future everything would be powered by tiny nuclear fusion reactors: automobiles, toothbrushes, time machines (apparently we read a lot of sci-fi from the 1950s). The truth, as usual, is more mundane than all that: some of the more promising advances we've s

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Emo Labs is out on a crusade to unify audio and video into one cohesive, delectable whole. If you'll recall, the company's Edge Motion invisible speaker tech relies on implanting a clear membrane atop display panels, which is then vibrated by piezoelectric actuators to generate stereo audio. We've

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Remember that piezoelectric road prototype we saw late last year? Looks like someone (besides us) thought it was a good idea. According to The Daily Mail, a Sainsbury's supermarket in Gloucester, UK (you've never been there), has installed kinetic plates in the parking lot that use the weight of sh

5 years ago 0 Comments
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digg_url = 'http://www.engadget.com/2009/03/31/researchers-develop-braille-for-vibrating-touchscreen/'; In braille, a character is made up of six dots laid out on a two by three matrix -- not something that can really be conveyed using capacitive touchscreen technology. Working with a Nokia 770 Int

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Ben Heck's at it again, and this time, he's cobbled together a breath-controlled kick pedal for use with Guitar Hero (or Rock Band, if that's your flavor) meant for people in wheelchairs, or who don't have use of their legs, but still want to get in on the rocking action. After tearing apart the ki

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Imagine this -- one day, with enough steroids, your pet hamster actually could power your home by just running on its wheel. Georgia Tech researchers have discovered ways to \"convert even irregular biomechanical energy into electricity,\" and it's demonstrating the finding by showing off jacket-wear

5 years ago 0 Comments
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The brainchild of designer Sang-Kyun Park, LightDrops is an umbrella that uses the piezoelectric effect of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) to transform falling rain into electricity, which is then used to light LEDs installed on the umbrella's underside. The heavier the rain falls (and the harder it

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Believe it or not, this actually isn't the first power-generating dance floor to harness some of the pent up energy of club-goers, but it is apparently the first one to hit the UK, and hopefully a sign of more to come. As you can see above, the dance floor makes use of a piezoelectric system that p

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Solar-powered dresses are so two years ago. These days, dames in the know are all about that piezoelectric material, evidenced by the incredibly flashy Piezing. Dreamed up and designed by Amanda Parkes, this piece of garb is all set to steal the show at the 2ndSkin expo in San Francisco, and accord

6 years ago 0 Comments
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There have certainly been gizmos to surface throughout the years that react in some form or fashion to rain, but Jean-Jacques Chaillout and colleagues at the Atomic Energy Commission in France are fantasizing about using those diminutive droplets of water to actually power useful creations. After us

6 years ago 0 Comments