Post Thumbnail

We've seen a few police departments institute wearable cameras for their officers, but not to the scale of what Los Angeles is doing. The city is purchasing 7,000 body cameras for its cops in an effort to increase transparency, according to The LA Times. At a press conference, LA Mayor Eric Garcet

2 days ago 0 Comments
December 16, 2014 at 9:32PM
Post Thumbnail

New York City's brass hasn't fully committed to tricking out its nearly 35,000 person police force with body cameras yet, but Mayor Bill DiBlasio is eager to give them a shot. That's why the NYPD is testing the waters with a pilot program that'll see select officers from six commands throughout th

15 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

In case it wasn't glaringly clear, police accountability is a major concern these days -- and the White House is convinced that technology can help solve the problem. It's now promising up to $263 million in matched funding for law enforcement agencies that want to buy body cameras for their offic

17 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

They're cruising the streets for embarrassing tweets. It's no secret that every year, the number of people driving under the influence of alcohol shoots up around Christmas. As part of its yearly crackdown, police in Sussex and Surrey are taking to Twitter to document the alcohol-related arrests t

17 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Federal law enforcement might not be having much success pushing for laws that require a security backdoor on your phone, but that doesn't mean it's out of options. Judges (including one who published an opinion on a New York fraud case) have been leaning on the All Writs Act, a 1789 law granting

22 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

The police aren't often fond of publishing body camera and dashcam footage online, but not necessarily for nefarious reasons -- the volume of privacy-focused video editing they require can prove overwhelming. In Seattle, for example, a flood of public disclosure requests from an anonymous programm

25 days ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Here's some trivia for your next trip to the pub. Did you know that, in Virginia, you don't have to tell the cops your phone's unlock code, but you're obliged to open it if you use a fingerprint based passcode? It's a quirky piece of legal precedent that's just been established in the state after

1 month ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

The DEA isn't the only US law enforcement agency using impersonation on the web to catch suspects, it seems. The American Civil Liberties Union's Christopher Soghoian has noticed documents showing that the FBI created a fake, spyware-laden version of the Seattle Times' website to catch a teen bomb

1 month ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

After visiting Ferguson, Missouri recently, a pair of Georgetown students realized the need to access cellphone videos of police misconduct in the event a device is destroyed. With that in mind, Brandon Anderson and Joseph Gruenbaum set out to develop the SWAT app -- software that sends your foota

2 months ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Both the Argentine and the UK police have nabbed bad guys with the help of drones in the past, but what about American cops? Well, the police department in Grand Forks, North Dakota, for one, is putting its drone to good use -- just recently, the city's cops have caught four underage men who've be

2 months ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

When a piracy site is targeted by authorities, the owner's usual trick is to move the website to another domain (and sometimes hosting provider) to re-establish access for users. The Pirate Bay is probably the biggest example of this, which has spent years avoiding internet blocks by leading polic

3 months ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

As the Ferguson protests made exceedingly clear, citizen journalism is both a blessing and a curse; while it can expose police brutality and censorship, it's also prone to misinformation. But how do you illustrate the complexity of the subject for the general public? If you're developer Nicky Ca

3 months ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

With more than six million CCTV cameras in operation, Britain is the most watched country in the world. London's police officers are trialling body-worn cameras to help bring about \"speedier justice,\" but only now are other forces beginning to find efficient ways to process that surveillance. Leic

5 months ago 0 Comments