Post Thumbnail

Thermoelectrics -- which use wasted heat to generate electricity -- could get a lot more interesting thanks to a company called Alphabet Energy. It's set to commercialize tetrahedrite, a metal that more than doubles the efficiency of current tech for as little as a fiftieth the cost. Thermoelectri

5 months ago 0 Comments
July 16, 2014 at 10:44AM
Post Thumbnail

Corsair's Dominator memory can apparently get quite hot, particularly if the overclocking bug catches you right. If a product shown off at CES hits the commercial market, however, everything is sure to stay cool. The Peltier cooling device is expected to play nice with second-gen Dominator modules,

5 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Not that mad scientists haven't figured out a way to convert waste heat into energy, but a team from Ohio State University has developed a new material that does the same sort of thing... just way, way better. The new material goes by the name thallium-doped lead telluride, and at least in theory,

6 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

We've heard of firms tinkering with the idea of converting excess heat directly to energy, and apparently, a team of scientists from the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have done just that. Oddly enough, the researchers ad

6 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

We've heard of firms tinkering with the idea of converting excess heat directly to energy, and apparently, a team of scientists from the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have done just that. Oddly enough, the researchers ad

6 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

It's been a tick since anyone 'round these parts has taken Peltier cooling seriously, but sure enough, North Carolina-based Nextreme Thermal Solutions is giving us reason to spark that conversation up once more. Its Ultra-High Packing Fraction (UPF) OptoCooler module utilizes \"thin-film thermal bum

6 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Our favorite German researchers over at the Fraunhofer Institute have developed \"entire electronic systems\" capable of operating battery-free from body heat alone. The picture above shows a wireless transmitter powered by the human hand. The 200 millivolts required to drive the device is supplied b

7 years ago 0 Comments