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It can be difficult to get waterborne objects to go in the right direction -- just ask any boat captain who has had to fight waves on a choppy sea. However, researchers at the Australian National University have developed a \"tractor beam\" (really, a wave generator) that would make it trivial for y

3 months ago 0 Comments
August 11, 2014 at 12:34AM
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San Francisco's been mulling this one over for some time now, but at long last, the city has taken a monumental step in turning nearby waves into energy. Mayor Gavin Newsom has stated that his city has just \"submitted a preliminary permit application to the federal government to develop a wave powe

5 years ago 0 Comments
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Make no mistake, there's a plethora of devices out there aimed squarely at rudely disrupting your nap, but a technique that utilizes a gaudy head wrap and magnetic pulses could make the process of conking out a whole lot easier. Apparently, scientists can use relatively standard medical equipment i

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Sure, there's quite a few way to circumvent the effects of asthma, but a new development coming out of McMaster University in Canada suggests that radiofrequency treatment can actually curb the amount of asthma attacks suffered by asthmatics. The device, which \"uses radio waves to heat the muscle li

7 years ago 0 Comments
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It's a good thing that Japan's Meteorological Agency actually had the nationwide earthquake warning system ready to rock in March, as the fiber optic system was put into use this month in an attempt to warn citizens of an imminent tsunami. Reportedly, a \"huge tremor\" struck and triggered the system

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We know, we're suckers for cheesy art, but we give props where props are due for the well designed, masterfully engineered pieces as well. While we doubt the Digital Stag is atop any thief's list of things to swipe, there's a decent chance the Italian funeral urn Cratere dei Niobidi is. This urn spu

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We'll admit, there's not a whole of gizmos invented 100 years ago that we still rely on (and bicker about) on a near-daily basis, but broadcast radio has managed to stay in our homes, cars, hearts, and complaint letters for a full century. Exactly one hundred years ago today, Reginald Fessenden fire

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We've got next-to-invisible objects and cameras with ridiculously large sensors, and thanks to a team of brilliant researchers over in Germany, now we've got \"an exotic material with a negative refractive index for visible light.\" Gunnar Dolling and his colleagues at the University of Karlsruhe in G

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Alright Europe, things were dubious enough when you erased children's rights to wireless access after believing that the radiation a good chunk of internet users have been subjecting themselves to for years is suddenly cause for concern, but this is a bit much. Undoubtedly crossing the line between

8 years ago 0 Comments