Latest in Cornell

Image credit:

Cornell robot is "conscious," adapts to injury

Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

Oh great. As if the potent, robotic cocktail of self-replication, self-awareness, and wireless power weren't bad enough, along comes Cornell University with a robot capable of not only discovering its own nature (something we can't even do) but then adapts to overcome injury. This four-legged robot starts out knowing only what parts it has, not where they are or how to use them for locomotion. It applies a scientific method of theory and experimentation to develop computer models and ultimately, a set of commands to turn its motors for that first cautious step. Even when researchers remove part of the toddling robot's leg, the little guy still figures out a way to limp forward. Cornell scientists go so far as to say that the robot is "conscious," albeit on a primitive level since it thinks to itself, "what would happen if I do this?" Yeah, that's a stretch, but a step closer to our doom nevertheless. Although the robot used to demonstrate these cognitive gymnastics is quite simple, the algorithm could be used to build more complex robots for say, space exploration or defending itself while standing in line for a PS3. Well, at least The Robots don't currently have a place to coalesce under a common roof of intellectual ferment... oh God, no! Still, any robot which drinks puddle water can't be too bright, eh?

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

The 2019 Engadget Holiday Gift Guide

The 2019 Engadget Holiday Gift Guide

View
Motorola's revived RAZR is a fashion-forward foldable

Motorola's revived RAZR is a fashion-forward foldable

View
Mark Wahlberg is poised to join the 'Uncharted' movie

Mark Wahlberg is poised to join the 'Uncharted' movie

View
John Carmack takes a step back at Oculus to work on human-like AI

John Carmack takes a step back at Oculus to work on human-like AI

View
NASA renames Kuiper Belt object following controversy

NASA renames Kuiper Belt object following controversy

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr