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IBM and friends buddy up on 32-nanometer semiconductor

Darren Murph
05.23.07
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IBM has most certainly been on a tear of late when it comes to microprocessors, as this tidbit comes right on the heels of the firm's 4.7GHz POWER6 and self-assembling CPUs. Presumably thinking that two five heads are better than one, IBM has garnered support from Chartered, Samsung, Infineon, and Freescale to "develop and manufacture advanced 32-nanometer semiconductors." Of course, we're still not sure if the loose ends surrounding IBM's 65-nanometer team effort are all tied off, but onward and upward they go regardless. The collaborative agreements between the firms "include 32-nanometer bulk complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process technologies and joint development of process design kits (PDKs) to support that technology," which basically means that the companies will attempt to work together at IBM's East Fishkill plant through 2010 to produce "high-performance, energy-efficient chips at 32nm." Unfortunately, we've no idea when these speedsters will be ready for the commercial world, but it's pretty safe to assume it won't be soon.

[Via PCWorld, photo courtesy of Semiconductor-Technology]

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