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Nintendo of Japan calling it quits on Famicom hardware support

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It's an end of an era, we suppose. No longer can you bash up your Famicom for flatly refusing to entertain your cartridge of choice and expect Nintendo of Japan to fix it up all pretty for you, like it's been doing for the past 20+ years. For whatever reason, Nintendo has been providing hardware support for the Famicom since its inception, which certainly seems a little extreme, but who's complaining? That support is finally ending, along with support for the Super Famicom, Nintendo 64, Game Boy and Game Boy Pocket -- relative newcomers to the console game when pitted against grandpa Famicom. Repairs will officially end on October 31st, and the reasoning is pretty simple: there just aren't enough spare parts laying around to make the repairs. Nintendo of America stopped supporting the NES a few years back, so this really is the end of the line. Oh, and Nintendo would like to take this opportunity to remind you that it wouldn't mind at all if you give it money again to repurchase your old favorites on the Wii's Virtual Console -- now that's service.

[Via Advanced MN Wii]

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