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Folding@home gets 'Good Design' award

Andrew Yoon, @scxzor
November 7, 2008
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Have you cured cancer lately? Maybe not, because you're too busy playing the excellent games on PS3 right now. But, why not take some time this weekend to launch Life With PlayStation and fold some proteins. (Join us at Group #57793.) Now is the best time to jump in the cancer-saving fun, especially because of a new award donned to the service.

The Japan Industrial Design Promotion Organization awarded Sony Computer Entertainment the "Good Design Gold Award 2008" for the support of the Folding@home project on PS3. "Analysis of proteins for the purpose of shedding light on diseases is just one example of solution design for social issues, a stance that indicates the direction that design should take in the future. Motivating the people who will be involved in these studies will be the key to success, but the program functions well as an idea for making participation in this project visible on a global scale."

So yeah, let's celebrate and fold at home this weekend!





In this article: folding@home, good-design
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