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Debunk: Jailbroken apps on a non-jailbroken iPhone? Not quite

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You may have seen some reports today about a new app from Ripdev called InstallerApp, which some people have mistakenly been covering as a desktop client that lets you install Cydia and Installer apps without having to jailbreak your iPhone using something like PwnageTool. Just to set the record straight, here's the deal: InstallerApp is a kind of jailbreaking tool (let's call it "jailbreaking lite") coupled with a separate application management client for your computer. From what we can tell, the first thing it does is jailbreak your device (or, if you're already jailbroken, installs some additional software so it can talk to your phone). In no way is it allowing you to install non-Apple-approved apps onto a non-jailbroken phone: it's tweaking your underlying system to allow for those apps to run, and giving you an iTunes replacement to add and delete programs on your device. Keep in mind, RipDev is charging $7 for this, which isn't a bundle, but not free either... unlike PwnageTool and QuickPwn, which essentially do the same thing (minus the desktop client). We're not saying it's not a useful app -- it might be to some -- it just isn't the "get out of jail free" solution that you may have heard it is. And now you know... which is half the battle.

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