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Stereoscopic copy-paste finally brings that clone tool into the third dimension (video)

Tim Stevens
December 26, 2010
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With the right software anybody can be photo editing guru, eliminating redeye, removing unsightly blemishes, and maybe adding an image of Godzilla lurking in the background just for fun. However, if you've been unlucky enough to try to do the same in 3D you know just how distinctly unsatisfying that experience can be. Maybe not for long. Thanks to NewScientist we just caught a glimpse of an October presentation made by Swiss engineers Joren van Baar and Wan-Yen Lo called "Stereoscopic 3D Copy & Paste." It is, basically, exactly what it sounds like, tools that let you define various objects and planes on a stereoscopic image, similar to how you might grab a shape with the magic wand tool, and then duplicate it and move that shape around on both parts of the 3D photo. The software handles re-creating shadows, automatically tackling occlusion too, and while the results aren't perfect, particularly if you're trying to change perspective or partially occlude an object behind something that's transparent, it certainly trumps trying to do it by hand. Check out the video below and take a moment to be thankful that you didn't have to buy gifts for all those kids above.





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