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US consumers purchase $55 million worth of 3D TVs and Blu-ray players, despite the glasses

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It's early days yet, but NPD claims that revenue from US sales of 3D TVs and standalone 3D-capable Blu-ray players has exceeded $55 million in the first three months of availability. Mind you, this steady growth comes despite the absence of some major players. While that number might sound big, it's tiny in comparison to the total number of TVs sold each month in the US and, according to our friend Ross Rubin, executive director of industry analysis at NPD, sales are expected to remain small throughout 2010. Regarding those much maligned 3D glasses, only 10% of those surveyed by NPD cited "looking silly" as a main concern. Instead, the biggest concern was not having enough glasses on hand for everyone looking at the set. A concern driven by cost, undoubtedly, and a dearth of survey participants from New York's trendy Lower East Side.

Disclaimer: NPD's Ross Rubin is a contributor to Engadget.

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3D Capable Home Entertainment Product Revenue Exceeds $55 Million in the U.S.

PORT WASHINGTON, NEW YORK, June 22, 2010 - 3D TV and 3D Blu-ray standalone player revenue in the U.S. has exceeded $55 million in the first three months since the launch of these products in February, according to leading market research company The NPD Group's Retail Tracking Service.

"3D TV and Blu-ray players are seeing steady growth even as major product line launches are slated for the coming months," said Ross Rubin, executive director of industry analysis at NPD. As more consumers adopt 3D, the industry can help foster a 3D ecosystem similar to that of HD."

One inhibitor to adoption of 3D TV at home is the need to wear special glasses when watching 3D TV. These glasses can add significant cost and work only with their brand of television. Only 10 percent of consumers surveyed in The NPD Group's Analyst Poll of NPD Panelists cited "looking silly" as a main concern of the glasses, whereas 41 percent cited not having enough glasses on hand for everyone watching the set.

"3D TV will be a premium home entertainment experience in 2010," said Rubin. "Many consumers have already shown that they are willing to use special glasses to obtain the effects, but want to preserve the social aspect of the group television viewing."

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