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Sandy Bridge memory performance tested, value of expensive top-shelf memory questioned

Tim Stevens
February 11, 2011
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Intel's Sandy Bridge chipset hasn't exactly had a flawless launch, but let's move past that and take a look at how well it performs before it starts breaking. One of the improvements here is meant to be better memory performance, and The Tech Report ran a variety of sticks through the gamut to see what the benefits of high-cost, high-speed memory is versus the cheaper stuff. The results showed that, in the vast majority of cases, DDR3-1333MHz memory was barely outclassed by the DDR3-2133MHz stuff, exhibiting only a modest improvement in games, just a couple FPS at most. Lesson learned? Save your pennies -- or go ahead and spend 'em elsewhere, like that new Thermaltake case.

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