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Aurasma Virtual Browser and virtual world hands-on

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Watching Aurasma in action is very impressive, it is tech that looks like magic. Aurasma is software that picks out objects, shapes, symbols -- which are called triggers -- with its Virtual Browser and understands what they are. Once the trigger is recognized, relevant content gets pushed across to the user using enhanced reality. For example, we have a look at a $20 bill during our demo and the bill in the phone display starts to deconstruct ending in some pretty serious rah rah sis boom bah. Aurasma is getting traction in advertising and we can only see this growing, it is really addictive fun. Users can grab the app free on either iOS or Android -- another mobile platform is coming with a name that doesn't rhyme with BlackBerry -- and get playing and creating. Aurasma also has a pro version -- also free -- with much more serious development tours for folks that really want to stretch its boundaries. Aurasma has been around for a while now but this is the first chance we've had a demo and we were very impressed. Click through to see money do crazy things and a Harry Potter poster come to life.



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