Latest in Back-up

Image credit:

Facebook to backup its servers with low-power storage devices at 'Sub-Zero' data center

Alexis Santos
08.18.12
47 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

Data backups come in all shapes and sizes. For some, they take the form of external hard drives or a slice of the amorphous cloud. As for Facebook, its upcoming solution is low-power deep-storage hardware contained within a 62,000 square-foot building in Prineville, Oregon near its existing Beaver State data center. Unofficially referred to as "Sub-Zero," the facility will store a copy of the social network's data in case its primary servers need to be restored in an emergency. Rather than continuously power HDDs that are only occasionally used, the new setup can conserve energy by lighting-up drives just when they're needed. One of the company's existing server racks eats up around 4.5 kilowatts, while those at Sub-Zero are each expected to consume approximately 1.5 kilowatts once they're up and running. Tom Furlong, Facebook's vice president of site operations, told Wired that there are hopes to create a similar structure alongside the firm's North Carolina data center. Since the Prineville project is still being planned, Zuckerberg & Co. have roughly six to nine months to suss out all the details before your photos are backed up at the new digs.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
47 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

Engadget's Guide to Privacy

Engadget's Guide to Privacy

View
Amazon rolls out a cash payment option for online orders in the US

Amazon rolls out a cash payment option for online orders in the US

View
Apple will use recycled rare earth metals in the iPhone's Taptic Engine

Apple will use recycled rare earth metals in the iPhone's Taptic Engine

View
Xfinity internet-only customers now get the Flex streaming platform for free

Xfinity internet-only customers now get the Flex streaming platform for free

View
YouTube is bringing a big, ugly ad banner to its TV app's home screen

YouTube is bringing a big, ugly ad banner to its TV app's home screen

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr