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Google Play Music now available for iPhone

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Hold onto your hats, music lovers, 'cause things just got a little crazy out there. Google just released Google Play Music for iPhone (free), an app that lets you "discover, play and share the music you love, anywhere."

It actually surprises me a bit that Apple allowed this app onto the App Store, since it's a direct competitor to the company's own iTunes Music Store and iTunes Radio. Google's All Access service (US$9.99 per month) for Google Play will allow music buffs to listen to unlimited songs; create custom radio stations based on songs, artists or albums; get recommendations on music based on your tastes; and use playlists created by Google music experts.

The free standard service provides a way to add up to 20,000 songs from your personal music library from Mac, Windows or Linux computers; listen through the app or Google's web player; and save favorite tunes to your device for offline playback. All of this is ad-free, and available in a variety of countries.

But wait, there's more! Google is also offering a free month of All Access in order to (hopefully) get you hooked on the service. And if you have a Chromecast device, you'll be able to beam your music wirelessly to it thanks to built-in compatibility in the Google Play Music app.

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