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New York Times' Today's Paper web app brings print-like design, offline reading to browsers

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Today marks the death of the New York Times' "experimental" HTML5 app designed for the iPad. But, from its ashes comes Today's Paper, another touch-friendly app built on the latest web technologies. Like the print edition of the broadsheet, Today's Paper is delivered (electronically) on a regular daily schedule. What's more, its structured similarly to tree-pulp version, for those that are a little uncomfortable with the heavily segmented apps and digital offerings. Since it's web-based, users will get the same experience on both the desktop and on tablets. Though, interaction on the mobile front it geared more towards swiping and gestures than clicking and scrolling.

All of the sections of the paper are faithfully recreated in the browser, and the last seven days worth of Times dispatches can be downloaded for offline reading. Obviously, you'll still have to remember to download them before you walk away from your WiFi. Oh, and you'll also need to be a paying subscriber -- either digital or home delivery are acceptable. If you fit (and pay) the bill, you can access the Today's Paper web app at app.nytimes.com/todayspaper.

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