Latest in Artemis

Image credit:

OnLive creator's next project could put an end to cellular reception woes

Steve Dent, @stevetdent
February 19, 2014
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Remember Steve Perlman? The serial entrepreneur has moved on from OnLive's messy transition and launched an enterprise called Artemis, with the lofty goal of fixing the cellular congestion plaguing modern carriers. Called pCell, it works by forcing frequencies that normally interfere and bog down a network to gang up for better reception, instead. Congestion could be thus relieved by adding more antennas, a strategy that doesn't work with current networks due to crosstalk. A demonstration to the New York Times showed Netflix HD and 4K videos streaming to at least a half dozen devices in the same room over a local LTE network, a feat the company said would be impossible on current networks. There's no word from any US carriers about any plans to adopt the tech, but Verizon did say that it was aware of it. In the meantime, Artemis said large scale tests will start in San Francisco later this year, with a commercial launch by the end of 2014. Check the video after the break for more.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

The Arcwave Ion is designed to 'give men a female orgasm'

The Arcwave Ion is designed to 'give men a female orgasm'

View
The Morning After: Our first impressions of the Xbox Series X

The Morning After: Our first impressions of the Xbox Series X

View
EA Play joins Xbox Game Pass Ultimate on November 10th

EA Play joins Xbox Game Pass Ultimate on November 10th

View
Nissan's Re-Leaf prototype is a mobile power supply for disaster response

Nissan's Re-Leaf prototype is a mobile power supply for disaster response

View
Microsoft thinks remote workers need a 'virtual commute'

Microsoft thinks remote workers need a 'virtual commute'

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr