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Google's EU-only form can help the internet forget about you

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Google has now complied with a European court ruling that it must remove links to personal data if requested. It has just put up a "right to be forgotten" form to help you remove links about yourself from its search results -- but not the pages themselves. To apply, you'll need to explain why the pages you want de-listed are "irrelevant, outdated, or... inappropriate" and supply valid ID like a driver's license. If your submission is accepted, Google will then strike the link from its searches and replace them with a notice similar to those it uses for takedowns. Google was not at all happy with the ruling, telling Re/Code earlier that it went too far by sacrificing the public's right to know for the right to privacy. Meanwhile, it's in the process of setting up a committee to evaluate requests with luminaries like Wikipedia's Jimmy Wales. Unfortunately, if you're in the US or anywhere else outside the EU: Fuggedaboutit.

Via: Re/Code
Source: Google
In this article: EU, Form, google, Privacy, RightToBeForgotten
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