Latest in Science

Image credit:

Scientists look at flower cells in 3D without wrecking them

22 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Plants are delicate things, which makes them a pain to study under an electron microscope -- you'll probably damage the very cells you're trying to look at. You'll get a much better look if the University of Florida's new imaging technique catches on, though. Their approach leans on both a compound fluorescence light microscope and a camera to capture several layers of cells, creating a detailed 3D snapshot of the cellular structure of something as fragile as a flower petal. The resulting pictures may not be shocking (surprise: there are lots of globs), but they should be a big deal for biologists. Researchers would have a better sense of how animal and plant tissues work when they're untouched by humans, which could go a long way toward fighting diseases and learning about new species.

[Image credit: Jacob B. Landis]

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
22 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Master & Dynamic's MW07 Plus are much-improved true wireless earbuds

Master & Dynamic's MW07 Plus are much-improved true wireless earbuds

View
Master & Dynamic's MW07 Go is a $199 AirPod alternative

Master & Dynamic's MW07 Go is a $199 AirPod alternative

View
California's statewide earthquake alert system launches Thursday

California's statewide earthquake alert system launches Thursday

View
Skydio's station lets self-flying drones work around the clock

Skydio's station lets self-flying drones work around the clock

View
‘Harry Potter: Wizards Unite’ gathered location data while users slept

‘Harry Potter: Wizards Unite’ gathered location data while users slept

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr