'Zelda' concert tour to celebrate 'Breath of the Wild'

'Symphony of the Goddesses' will feature a new piece from Link's latest adventure.

Sponsored Links

Nintendo
Nintendo

If you love The Legend of Zelda, or appreciate top video game tunes, there's nothing like a Symphony of the Goddesses performance. The live, orchestral concert series has dazzled fans of Link and Hyrule for the past five years, with epic renditions of classic tracks from A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time and more. Today, concert organiser Jason Michael Paul Entertainment has announced the dates for the 2017 Tour. It's also teased some set list changes, including a new piece from Breath of the Wild, an "all-new movement" from Skyward Sword and an updated overture.

The fourth season begins on March 17th in Bueonos Aires, Argentina. The show then travels across South America, North America, the UK and other parts of Europe, including Spain, Germany and Italy (you can check out the full tour schedule here). It's a pretty big year for The Legend of Zelda, following the release of Breath of the Wild on the Nintendo Switch. The game has been praised by the press, earning a 97 percent score on Metacritic and a glowing review from Engadget's own Aaron Souppouris. Interest in the Symphony of the Goddesses tour should, therefore, be high.

If you manage to snag tickets, you can expect a two-hour concert performed by a 66-piece orchestra and 24-person choir. The group will perform tracks from Zelda adventures old and new, including Majora's Mask, A Link Between Worlds and Twilight Princess. While you sit and enjoy the tunes, a video collage will play behind the band, matching each score with defining moments from the franchise. "Besides all the new stuff, we're also bringing back the Ballad of the Wind Fish from the original program, which has been a big request from fans for a while," Jason Michael Paul said. We can think of few better ways to celebrate the series.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Popular on Engadget