Latest in Gear

Image credit:

Google's annual report shows more web traffic is encrypted

The number of websites and devices defaulting to HTTPS is climbing.
Richard Lawler, @Rjcc
October 21, 2017
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Google

For several years now, Google has been exerting pressure to increase the usage of HTTPS across the internet. By defaulting to secure connections on both ends, users can be protected from anyone who may intercept or even manipulate data as it flows back and forth -- quite useful in a world where you can't even trust WiFi. For its own products, Google says HTTPS use is up to 89 percent overall, up from just 50 percent at the beginning of 2014. The number of top 100 websites defaulting to HTTPS has nearly doubled since last year (way to catch up), growing from 37 to 71.

Percentage of pages loaded over HTTPS in Chrome by platform

Now that Google is flagging websites that request data without securing the connection first, developers have even more reason to make the switch. In its Chrome browser, Google says 73 percent of pages in the US are now delivered with encryption. One thing holding back the numbers are older mobile devices that don't support encryption due to their hardware, but you can get the full interactive chart breakdowns on Google's report website.

In this article: chrome, encryption, gear, google, https, internet
All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Microsoft Edge becomes the second most popular desktop web browser

Microsoft Edge becomes the second most popular desktop web browser

View
Safari flaw let intruders hijack cameras on iPhones and Macs

Safari flaw let intruders hijack cameras on iPhones and Macs

View
School districts ban Zoom over security concerns

School districts ban Zoom over security concerns

View
Twitter bans deepfakes that are 'likely to cause harm'

Twitter bans deepfakes that are 'likely to cause harm'

View
Honeywell says it built the world's most powerful quantum computer

Honeywell says it built the world's most powerful quantum computer

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr