Latest in Gear

Image credit:

Microsoft Edge now supports passwordless sign-ins

Securely sign into websites using your face or fingerprints.
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Microsoft

Edge users will soon be able to securely sign into websites without having to remember their passwords. Microsoft has today announced support for the Web Authentication specification in the browser, which will let you log on using Windows Hello hardware (so that's IR cameras and fingerprint readers), as well as PINs or external FIDO2 security keys, like the one launched by Google last week.

You can try it out now by installing Windows Insider Preview build 17723 or higher, or wait until later this year when it's available to the general public in Windows 10 version 1809. Of course, because this tech is so new (Google's only recently begun doing the same), it'll be a while before many websites get on board, although Microsoft does say in its launch blog post that it's "working with industry partners on lighting up the first passwordless experiences around the web." It's also made it simple for websites to utilize backwards compatibility with external FIDO U2F security devices, so while it'll take a while for mainstream adoption to take hold, this does mark the beginning of a brand new security experience.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Apple program will replace AirPods Pro buds with crackling, ANC issues

Apple program will replace AirPods Pro buds with crackling, ANC issues

View
Chevy will start selling EV retrofit kits in 2021

Chevy will start selling EV retrofit kits in 2021

View
$149 Playdate handheld is 'ready to go,' orders start in early 2021

$149 Playdate handheld is 'ready to go,' orders start in early 2021

View
Roborace engineer explains why a driverless racecar drove into a wall

Roborace engineer explains why a driverless racecar drove into a wall

View
Scientists found an Earth-sized ‘rogue’ planet in the Milky Way

Scientists found an Earth-sized ‘rogue’ planet in the Milky Way

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr