Latest in Gear

Image credit:

Turing's newest phone is even more ridiculous than its last

The HubblePhone includes a lot of ideas, but not much substance.
Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
July 31, 2018
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Turing Space Industries

Turing may have gone bankrupt without shipping a single unit of its much-hyped smartphone, but that isn't stopping it from promising another handset. The company has unveiled the HubblePhone (yes, named after the space telescope), and it's even more outlandish than the first. The design would include dual display "decks," one of which would swivel out to help with video recording and similar tasks -- a good thing, too, since it would revolve around a 60-megapixel main camera tucked into a cylindrical section. There would even be notches on the displays with more cameras, including dual variable-aperture 12MP sensors and a depth camera on the main deck as well as a 12MP sensor on the upper deck. And that's just the start of the ambitious claims.

The hardware would supposedly run on the (still unannounced) Snapdragon 855 in each section, complete with separate batteries, and it would hop on the AI bandwagon. Turing is promising an "emotional machine-intelligence chip" that would provide a "next-gen mobile gaming experience" through mixed reality. You could even use lip reading to issue spoken commands without broadcasting your intentions, according to the company. And of course, you could expect wish-list features like 5G data and a scroll wheel.

You'd have to wait a while for the phone to ship, since it's not supposed to arrive until the first quarter of 2020 for a staggering $2,749 (how Turing calculated that price when some of its components don't even exist yet, we don't know). You might have to wait longer still depending on where you live, since Turing isn't guaranteeing some releases until June or later that year. We'll be honest, though: it will be surprising if this phone ever ships, let alone on time. Even if all the technology pans out, a lot can change in the space of a year and a half. We wouldn't count on those changes working out in Turing's favor, especially given its track record.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Researchers 3D-printed a cell-sized tugboat

Researchers 3D-printed a cell-sized tugboat

View
MIT tests autonomous 'Roboat' that can carry two passengers

MIT tests autonomous 'Roboat' that can carry two passengers

View
Microsoft's 'Mandalorian' Xbox controller will set you back $160

Microsoft's 'Mandalorian' Xbox controller will set you back $160

View
Samsung, Stanford make a 10,000PPI display that could lead to 'flawless' VR

Samsung, Stanford make a 10,000PPI display that could lead to 'flawless' VR

View
NASA will try to stow away its leaking asteroid sample tomorrow

NASA will try to stow away its leaking asteroid sample tomorrow

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr