Latest in Tomorrow

Image credit:

SpaceX's 'Starhopper' test vehicle takes a short Raptor-powered trip

Elon Musk said all systems are green after its tiny tethered hop.
Richard Lawler, @Rjcc
April 3, 2019
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Bloomberg via Getty Images

As SpaceX proceeds with development of its Starship vehicle, it's first testing out the spacecraft's Raptor engines. Today a stubby Starhopper test vehicle mounted with a single engine -- as opposed to the more advanced Phase 2 version shown above -- completed its first tethered hop of just a few inches at the Texas launch site, as spotted by nearby observers. Elon Musk tweeted "All systems green" after the test, which may not have gone far but recalls the early days of Grasshopper rocket tests before we got used to the sight of Falcon 9 rocket engines returning to Earth after successful launches.

Musk previously said that suborbital test flights would require three of the engines -- the final version of Starship f.k.a BFR will have more -- and we'll be waiting to see when that happens.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Apple shuffles hardware execs to make room for a mysterious new project

Apple shuffles hardware execs to make room for a mysterious new project

View
A personal trainer app guilt-tripped me into exercising (and it worked)

A personal trainer app guilt-tripped me into exercising (and it worked)

View
‘Cyberpunk 2077’ update introduced a game-breaking bug | Engadget

‘Cyberpunk 2077’ update introduced a game-breaking bug | Engadget

View
Google reveals North Korean-backed campaign targeting security researchers

Google reveals North Korean-backed campaign targeting security researchers

View
Scientists find a cloudless 'hot Jupiter' exoplanet with a four-day year

Scientists find a cloudless 'hot Jupiter' exoplanet with a four-day year

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr