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OmniVision wins Guinness World Record for its tiny medical image sensor

The ultra small device is cost effective and more comfortable for patients.
Rachel England, @rachel_england
October 22, 2019
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OmniVision

OmniVision is the new holder of the Guinness World Record for the smallest commercially available image sensor. The tiny device (pictured above in a camera module next to a grain of pepper) measures just half a millimetre squared, and will have a significant impact on the medical imaging landscape.

Traditionally, procedures in the body's smallest anatomy -- such as neuro, ENT, cardiac, spinal and gynaecology procedures -- were performed blind or with low quality images from fiberscopes, because existing cameras were too big and reusable endoscopes were not cost effective. OmniVision's tiny image sensor, used in conjunction with its 0.65mm x 0.65mm camera module, addresses these issues.

As OmniVision's marketing director Aaron Chiang explains, the technology "offers a compact, high quality solution for disposable guidewires, catheters and endoscopes, which are experiencing growing demand because of their ability to reduce cross-contamination risks, downtime inefficiencies and costs associated with the repairs, preprocedural testing and sterilization of reusable endoscopes."

The sensor is also the only ultra small "chip on tip" camera with backside illumination, which provides excellent image quality and better low-light performance to help reduce LED heat, along with improved sensitivity. Not only does that stand to improve cost effectiveness for hospitals, but it's good news for patients, too, says Chiang, who notes that the compact disposable device "can improve patient comfort and shorten recovery time."

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