The first ‘Call of Duty: Warzone’ update aims to even the playing field

Custom loadouts should be harder to obtain, and rage quitters may cause fewer problems.
Marc DeAngelis
M. DeAngelis|03.27.20

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Infinity Ward/Raven Software/Activision
Infinity Ward/Raven Software/Activision

Call of Duty: Warzone is the long-running franchise's attempt to jump on the free-to-play battle royale bandwagon, and according to critics and players, it's probably worth checking out if you're a fan of the genre -- the game has over 30 million players already. There are some issues, though, and a new patch should take care of a few of them. Namely, custom loadouts will be harder to obtain, meaning players will have a more even selection of weapons -- or will have to play better to gain the advantage of using their favorite guns.

Warzone players used to pay $6,000 in in-game cash -- which is obtained by looting enemies -- for a loadout. Less experienced gamers have far less of a chance of having enough funds for a loadout, which made the game noticeably unbalanced. Warzone also allows those who have played 2019's Call of Duty: Modern Warfare to bring their hard-earned weapons with them, making it even more difficult for new players to stay competitive. The patch raises the price to $8,500, and will hopefully make custom weapon selections more of a reward than a standard part of the game.

Another tweak nerfs the game's shotgun, which previously could cause a one-hit-kill if fired at close range. The update will make it harder for shotgun users to go on killing sprees. Players who purchase special ammo can still achieve one-hit-kills with the shotgun, though. Rage quitters will hopefully cause fewer headaches, too -- the game will count certain quits as kills.

Call of Duty: Warzone is only a few weeks old, so it's encouraging to see Infinity Ward taking care of players' gripes so quickly. Hopefully the changes help make the game more enjoyable to newcomers without turning off long-time Modern Warfare players.

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