AI music app AiMi lets you set the tempo and mood of endless playlists

An update now lets you choose between six vibes.

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The craze for blissful background music ideal for studying or chilling out to has spawned popular YouTube channels, streaming playlists and even AI-powered apps. AiMi — which today is rolling out a major update for its generative music service — sits squarely in the latter camp alongside peers Endel and Brain.fm. A little more than a year after its debut, the app for electronic music fans is launching a new interface that gives listeners six endless mixes to choose from. Their titles, including Serenity and Chill and Deep, give you an indication of the type of meditative, lo-fi and deep house beats on offer. 

So how does an AI-powered music app work? In AiMi's case, you hit play to listen to a feed of continuous music, including real tracks, generated by artificial intelligence. Whereas previously you could adjust the tempo of the mix using an energy scale of 1 to 10, the service now uses a thumbs up/thumbs down feature to learn your preferences. 

AIMI has also ditched its paid subscription and is now completely free. The company says its platform is powered by a team of in-house artists including producers Knobcult, Blond:ish and DJ Monarke, among others. But, thus far, it hasn't revealed any high-profile collaborations with pop stars, unlike the competition. Take its rival Endel, the ambient music service, which costs $60 per year, previously released an AI Lullaby featuring original music and vocals from electronic artist Grimes.

Though, with a major backer in AiMi's corner, a big-name guest spot may not be a stretch. The app is represented by Shore Fire, a pop culture PR behemoth whose clients span Grammy winners and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees. The agency also handles publicity for Quincy Jones-backed NFT platform OneOf, whose early partners include Doja Cat and John Legend.

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