Boring Company proposes Fort Lauderdale transit loop for trips to the beach

It would be the company's first East Coast tunnel system.

Sponsored Links

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - APRIL 09:  A Tesla car drives through a tunnel in the Central Station during a media preview of the Las Vegas Convention Center Loop on April 9, 2021 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Las Vegas Convention Center Loop is an underground transportation system that is the first commercial project by Elon Musk’s The Boring Company. The USD 52.5 million loop, which includes two one-way vehicle tunnels 40 feet beneath the ground and three passenger stations, will take convention attendees across the 200-acre convention campus for free in all-electric Tesla vehicles in under two minutes. To walk that distance can take upward of 25 minutes. The system is designed to carry 4,400 people per hour using a fleet of 62 vehicles at maximum capacity. It is scheduled to be fully operational in June when the facility plans to host its first large-scale convention since the COVID-19 shutdown. There are plans to expand the system throughout the resort corridor in the future.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Elon Musk's Boring Company is still trying to sell cities on transit loops, and it might just have a significant buyer. As The Verge reports, the Boring Company has submitted a bid for a transit tunnel loop that would link the downtown with the beach. The Las Olas Loop would be an "innovative and unprecented" way to manage traffic congestion and transit demands, Mayor Dean Trantalis claimed.

The City Commission will vote on the proposal on July 6th. It also plans to establish a process where other companies can offer rival projects. Specific details won't be available until after the competition is over, the city said.

A successful bid would establish the Boring Company's first East Coast tunnel. The only existing tunnel, in Las Vegas, launched in June.

It would be a crucial win. Musk's outfit hasn't had much success pitching cities on passenger loops, and has even shifted some of its attention to larger freight tunnels. A Fort Lauderdale contract would give the passenger system more credibility and might encourage other cities to consider tunnels of their own — at least, so long as the tunnels prove to be useful.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Popular on Engadget