Garmin's services are slowly coming back to life after a major outage

Plenty of its services are still affected, but you can sync activities from your watch now.
Nathan Ingraham
N. Ingraham|07.27.20

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Nathan Ingraham
July 27th, 2020
A runner wearing a Garmin smart watch, a device which Stanford professor Michael Snyder suggests might be used to help detect early coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection, stretches before a workout in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., July 23, 2020.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Brian Snyder / Reuters

Late last week, Garmin suffered a major services outage — and now, more than four days later, things still aren’t back to normal. The company put up a barebones FAQ on Saturday the 25th, but its Twitter account hasn’t offered an update since then. However, it looks like things are slowly but surely coming back to life. Yesterday, activity-tracking app Strava confirmed that it was again able to send workout data to Garmin’s Connect service.

We’ve also heard from a few users that things are slowly coming back to life. Ian in Mountain View wrote in to let us know that recent activities were syncing to Strava from his Garmin Fenix watch and that notifications had started to work again, as well. And one Engadget editor also is seeing workout data from syncing from her watch to Strava via Garmin Connect, as well. But a quick look at Garmin’s system status page shows there are still plenty of issues across its platform.

Unfortunately, Garmin’s relative lack of communication around these issues means we still don’t know exactly what went wrong or when users can expect things to be back to normal. A few other key services, like registering a new device, are also back up and running, but if you’re still experiencing oddities with your Garmin devices, you’ll have to keep being patient. Last week, ZDNet claimed that the outage was due to a ransomware attack on the company’s internal network, something that even shut down its call center and online support tools. We’ve reached out to Garmin for any update it can give us on when it expects to have everything back online again and what brought the system down in the first place, and we’ll update this story with anything we learn.

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