Google TV is getting kids profiles this month

It'll be easier to manage screen time and what TV apps your kids can access.
Nathan Ingraham
N. Ingraham|03.08.21

Sponsored Links

Google TV kids profiles
Google

It's been almost six months since Google launched its latest TV-focused platform, appropriately called Google TV, alongside new Chromecast hardware. Somewhat surprisingly, Google TV arrived without some essential features for families with young children, as there were no kids profiles or parental controls. That's being fixed, as Google TV will soon support kids profiles and various screen time control features.

Google says you can add new profiles using existing Google accounts, assuming your child is old enough to have one. Otherwise, you can just add a profile with a name and age. From there, parents can decide what apps they want to be available on a kids profile and share movies and TV shows that were purchased on an adult's account with the rest of the family. The profiles will also show recommendations from specifically kid-friendly apps; hopefully this will keep any unsavory conspiracy theories from YouTube from popping up on a profile. 

Screen time limits are also built into these profile, letting a parent say how much time each kid gets; there's also a "bedtime" schedule to wind things down, not unlike the digital well-being features found on most smartphones these days. You can also sync these screen time limits across other Google devices like a Chromebook or Android phone using the Family Link app. From there you can see how much time your kids are spending in various apps as well as block and unblock various apps.

These new features will roll out to Google TV users in the US over the next month; they'll be available "globally" over the next couple months. There aren't many Google TV devices yet besides the new Chromecast, but as the platform becomes more widely available, these parental control features should be ready to go for new users. 

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Popular on Engadget